Book Club

Interested in reading a good book? Join us at the SEAPAX book club. Check out the next book, when and where we meet on this page: 


 2019 SEAPAX Book Club


A House Without Windows

“A House Without Windows” by Nadia Hashimi

Feb. 3rd, 2019 3pm – 5pm

Tougo Coffe Co.

1410 18th Ave. Seattle, WA 98122

 

A vivid, unforgettable story of an unlikely sisterhood—an emotionally powerful and haunting story of friendship that illuminates the plight of women in a traditional culture, from the author of the bestselling The Pearl That Broke Its Shell and When the Moon Is Low.

 

For two decades, Zeba was a loving wife, a patient mother, and a peaceful villager. But her quiet life is shattered when her husband, Kamal, is found brutally murdered with a hatchet in the courtyard of their home. Nearly catatonic with shock, Zeba is unable to account for her whereabouts at the time of his death. Her children swear their mother could not have committed such a heinousact. Kamal’s family is sure she did, and demands justice. Barely escaping a vengeful mob, Zeba is arrested and jailed. Awaiting trial, she meets a group of women whose own misfortunes have led them to these bleak cells: eighteen-year-old Nafisa, imprisoned to protect her from an “honor killing”; twenty-five-year-old Latifa, a teen runaway who stays because it is safe shelter; twenty-year-old Mezghan, pregnant and unmarried, waiting for a court order to force her lover’s hand. Is Zeba a cold-blooded killer, these young women wonder, or has she been imprisoned, like them, for breaking some social rule? For these women, the prison is both a haven and a punishment; removed from the harsh and unforgiving world outside, they form a lively and indelible sisterhood.

 

Into this closed world comes Yusuf, Zeba’s Afghan-born, American-raised lawyer whose commitment to human rights and desire to help his homeland have brought him back. With the fate this seemingly ordinary housewife in his hands, Yusuf discovers that, like the Afghanistan itself, his client may not be at all what he imagines.

 

A moving look at the lives of modern Afghan women, The House with No Windows is astonishing, frightening, and triumphant.

 

=~=~=~=~=~=


The Girl Who Smiled Beads: A Story of War and What Comes After

“The Girl Who Smiled Beads: A Story of War and What Comes After” by Clemantine Wamariya and Elizabeth Weil

April 7th, 2019 3pm – 5pm

Honey at Alma Mater

1322 Fawcett Ave. Tacoma, WA 98402

 

A riveting story of dislocation, survival, and the power of stories to break or save us.

 

Clemantine Wamariya was six years old when her mother and father began to speak in whispers, when neighbors began to disappear, and when she heard the loud, ugly sounds her brother said were "thunder." In 1994, she and her fifteen-year-old sister, Claire, fled the Rwandan massacre and spent the next six years wandering through seven African countries, searching for safety--perpetually hungry, imprisoned and abused, enduring and escaping refugee camps, finding unexpected kindness, witnessing inhuman cruelty. They did not know whether their parents were dead or alive.

 

When Clemantine was twelve, she and her sister were granted asylum in the United States, where she embarked on another journey--to excavate her past and, after years of being made to feel less than human, claim her individuality.

 

Raw, urgent, and bracingly original, The Girl Who Smiled Beads captures the true costs and aftershocks of war: what is forever destroyed; what can be repaired; the fragility of memory; the disorientation that comes of other people seeing you only as broken--thinking you need, and want, to be saved. But it is about more than the brutality of war. It is about owning your experiences, about the life we create: intricately detailed, painful, beautiful, a work in progress. 

 

=~=~=~=~=~=

 

The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life

 

“The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life” by Lauren Markham

June 2nd, 2019 3pm – 5pm

Guanaco's Tacos Pupuseria

4106 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

 

The deeply reported story of identical twin brothers who escape El Salvador's violence to build new lives in California--fighting to survive, to stay, and to belong.

 

Growing up in rural El Salvador in the wake of the civil war, Ernesto Flores had always had a fascination with the United States, the faraway land of skyscrapers and Nikes, while his identical twin, Raul, never felt that northbound tug. But when Ernesto ends up on the wrong side of the region's brutal gangs he is forced to flee the country, and Raul, because he looks just like his brother, follows close behind--away from one danger and toward the great American unknown.

 

In this urgent chronicle of contemporary immigration, journalist Lauren Markham follows the seventeen-year-old Flores twins as they make their harrowing journey across the Rio Grande and the Texas desert, into the hands of immigration authorities, and from there to their estranged older brother's custody in Oakland, CA. Soon these unaccompanied minors are navigating a new school in a new language, working to pay down their mounting coyote debt, and facing their day in immigration court, while also encountering the triumphs and pitfalls of life as American teenagers-girls, grades, Facebook-with only each other for support. With intimate access and breathtaking range, Markham offers a coming of age tale that is also a nuanced portrait of Central America's child exodus, an investigation of U.S. immigration policy, and an unforgettable testament to the migrant experience.


=~=~=~=~=~=


Then Again

 

“Then Again” by Ben Berman 
Aug. 4th, 2019 3pm – 5pm
KOKU Cafe + Market

1417 Queen Anne Ave N #101b, Seattle, WA 98109

 

The interrelated short prose pieces in Ben Berman’s Then Again explore a life outside of chronological order, bounce back and forth between foreign adventures and domestic routines. One moment we’re in a Mommy and Me yoga class, the next we’re gutting a goat in rural Zimbabwe. As much a meditation on language as a coming to terms with middle age, these stories navigate the distance between words and worlds. And yet whether getting chased by wild dogs through the alleyways of Kathmandu or desperately trying to stop his three-year-old from drawing all over the walls, Berman contemplates life’s ambiguities with both wisdom and wonder.



Dear Seattle-RPCVs,

My name is Ben Berman and I am an RPCV (Zimbabwe 1998-2000) and writer in the Boston area. I am writing because I saw that you have an RPCV book club in Seattle and I was wondering if you’d have any interest in considering my forthcoming book of short prose (which comes out just after Thanksgiving) for your 2019 reading list.

My first book, Strange Borderlands, which chronicled my time as a volunteer in Zimbabwe, won the 2014 Peace Corps Award for best book of poetry, and my forthcoming collection of short-short stories, Then Again, is a follow-up to that book – the stories bounces back and forth between pieces set in Zimbabwe and ones that explore the domestic life. In many ways, I think of it as my RPCV book – an exploration of what it means to try to make sense of our Peace Corps experiences once we return home.

I very much enjoyed visiting RPCV book clubs – both in person and over Skype – when my first book came out and the chance to discuss my writing with fellow RPCVs. I’ve included the publisher’s description of the book below in case you’re interested in learning more about the book.

Thanks so much for considering, and I hope this finds you well.

Ben Berman

www.ben-berman.com

http://www.vineleavespress.com/then-again-by-ben-berman.html

 

=~=~=~=~=~=

Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood

“Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood” by Trevor Noah

Oct. 6th, 2019 3pm – 5pm

Location: TBD

 

The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime New York Times bestseller about one man’s coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed.

Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents’ indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle.

Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man’s relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother—his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life.

The eighteen personal essays collected here are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother’s unconventional, unconditional love.